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Latest updates from RESTOR

How to Choose a Top Quality Roofing Contractor

Brian Southard contractors, damage assessment, Emergency Restoration, Roofing

Due to the cost of installing a new roof, and because your roof is your home’s first line of defense against the elements, it’s important to hire the best roofing company possible. Here are a few ground rules to help you find the best pro for your home.

1. Talk to Several Contractors

Speak with several roofing companies to establish your price range. It’s also important to note that the winning bid should be relative to the overall price of your job. If you’re spending several thousand dollars on your roof, don’t be swayed by the difference of a few hundred dollars. The more time you spend interviewing potential contractors, the better chance you have of getting the roof you need at an affordable price.
2. Research Credentials
Checking out your contractor’s work history is a must to ensure a quality job. Ask for licensing and at least three references while interviewing contractors. Any delay of information is usually a bad sign.

3. Review the Contract and Warranties
Never sign a contract without a thorough reading. Taking your time to understand the terms of your agreement is important in finding the perfect pro. Also, make sure you understand the warranty that comes with your new roof. A five-year guarantee on the materials and workmanship and a 20 to 40-year warranty on the roof itself are standard.

4. Cover Your Bases

Cover your bases before work begins. Check with your contractor about whether you need to acquire a permit (most roofing companies will pull permits for you). If you’re submitting an insurance claim on your roof, make certain that you’ve followed all the necessary procedures before work begins.

5. Never Pay the Entire Balance Upfront

Never pay the entire balance of your new roof upfront. It’s a common and acceptable practice for a contractor to ask for a deposit or establish a payment schedule that coincides with completed work. Either way, avoid paying with cash. Using a credit card makes recovering money a simple process.

 

Finding the right roofing pro can seem a bit overwhelming. But, by following the five tips listed above you can take comfort in knowing that you’ve found the right pro for the job.

RESTOR | Roof Inspection Tips From The Pros

Markus Kidwell contractors, damage assessment, inspections, Roofing

roofSTORM DAMAGE:  Two words most homeowners don’t want to hear when talking about their roof. This phrase can strike fear in the hearts of anyone who has ever experienced significant and costly damage that required extensive repairs or even roof replacement. The key to minimizing damage – as much as possible – is to know how to inspect for problems right after the storm so you can hire a roofing or restoration company to get the repairs done as quickly as possible. These tips from the pros are a great place to start.

Complete a Thorough Inspection

Perhaps the most critical thing you can do after a storm hits—whether it’s high winds, tornado, heavy rains, or hail—is to take a close look at the roof. Be sure to wait until it’s safe to inspect, and don’t get up on the roof unless you have proper safety equipment to prevent falls. Homeowners with little or no experience in roofing might not know what to look for, and in those cases it’s often better to hire a roofing contractor to perform the inspection for you. RESTOR is proud to offer fast, FREE roof inspections, so save yourself the hassle and danger by calling us today at 317-644-0099.

Look for Shingle Damage

Roof damage can come in many forms, but often the damage that results from a storm will be pretty visible on the shingles. Look for damage that could include:

  • Missing shingles or sections of shingles after high winds
  • “Bruised” shingles from hail
  • Cracks or bubbling surfaces on the shingles that might indicate water damage underneath

Inspect Both Sides of the Roof

The top of your roofing only tells half the story—to truly get a picture of what’s happening on the roof you will need to check both the top and bottom. That probably means getting up in your attic to inspect the under side of the roofing, where you can check for signs of water leaks; the most obvious are water streaks on the rafters, mold and mildew growth, excessive humidity or condensation, rusted metal or nails, and wet insulation. If it’s a sunny day you might also notice small holes where light is shining through.

If you see any of these signs of a problem, call RESTOR right away to provide an professional inspection, help you make repairs, and be better prepared for the next storm.

Thinking of Selling Your Home? We’ve Got 10 Great Tips.

Markus Kidwell home maintenance, home selling, technology, Uncategorized, Videos

Click here for video:  Home Selling Primer

HGTV’s Buying and Selling offers up the industry’s best-kept secrets to help you get top dollar when selling your home.

Selling Secret #10: Pricing it right
Find out what your home is worth, then shave 15 to 20 percent off the price. You’ll be stampeded by buyers with multiple bids — even in the worst markets — and they’ll bid up the price over what it’s worth. It takes real courage and most sellers just don’t want to risk it, but it’s the single best strategy to sell a home in today’s market.
Selling Secret #9: Half-empty closets
Storage is something every buyer is looking for and can never have enough of. Take half the stuff out of your closets then neatly organize what’s left in there. Buyers will snoop, so be sure to keep all your closets and cabinets clean and tidy.
Selling Secret #8: Light it up
Maximize the light in your home. After location, good light is the one thing that every buyer cites that they want in a home. Take down the drapes, clean the windows, change the lampshades, increase the wattage of your light bulbs and cut the bushes outside to let in sunshine. Do what you have to do make your house bright and cheery – it will make it more sellable.
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Selling Secret #7: Play the agent field
A secret sale killer is hiring the wrong broker. Make sure you have a broker who is totally informed. They must constantly monitor the multiple listing service (MLS), know what properties are going on the market and know the comps in your neighborhood. Find a broker who embraces technology – a tech-savvy one has many tools to get your house sold.
Selling Secret #6: Conceal the critters
You might think a cuddly dog would warm the hearts of potential buyers, but you’d be wrong. Not everybody is a dog- or cat-lover. Buyers don’t want to walk in your home and see a bowl full of dog food, smell the kitty litter box or have tufts of pet hair stuck to their clothes. It will give buyers the impression that your house is not clean. If you’re planning an open house, send the critters to a pet hotel for the day.
Selling Secret #5: Don’t over-upgrade
Quick fixes before selling always pay off. Mammoth makeovers, not so much. You probably won’t get your money back if you do a huge improvement project before you put your house on the market. Instead, do updates that will pay off and get you top dollar. Get a new fresh coat of paint on the walls. Clean the curtains or go buy some inexpensive new ones. Replace door handles, cabinet hardware, make sure closet doors are on track, fix leaky faucets and clean the grout.
Selling Secret #4: Take the home out of your house
One of the most important things to do when selling your house is to de-personalize it. The more personal stuff in your house, the less potential buyers can imagine themselves living there. Get rid of a third of your stuff – put it in storage. This includes family photos, memorabilia collections and personal keepsakes. Consider hiring a home stager to maximize the full potential of your home. Staging simply means arranging your furniture to best showcase the floor plan and maximize the use of space.
Selling Secret #3: The kitchen comes first
You’re not actually selling your house, you’re selling your kitchen – that’s how important it is. The benefits of remodeling your kitchen are endless, and the best part of it is that you’ll probably get 85% of your money back. It may be a few thousand dollars to replace countertops where a buyer may knock $10,000 off the asking price if your kitchen looks dated. The fastest, most inexpensive kitchen updates include painting and new cabinet hardware. Use a neutral-color paint so you can present buyers with a blank canvas where they can start envisioning their own style. If you have a little money to spend, buy one fancy stainless steel appliance. Why one? Because when people see one high-end appliance they think all the rest are expensive too and it updates the kitchen.
Selling Secret #2: Always be ready to show
Your house needs to be “show-ready” at all times – you never know when your buyer is going to walk through the door. You have to be available whenever they want to come see the place and it has to be in tip-top shape. Don’t leave dishes in the sink, keep the dishwasher cleaned out, the bathrooms sparkling and make sure there are no dust bunnies in the corners. It’s a little inconvenient, but it will get your house sold.
Selling Secret #1: The first impression is the only impression
No matter how good the interior of your home looks, buyers have already judged your home before they walk through the door. You never have a second chance to make a first impression. It’s important to make people feel warm, welcome and safe as they approach the house. Spruce up your home’s exterior with inexpensive shrubs and brightly colored flowers. You can typically get a 100-percent return on the money you put into your home’s curb appeal. Entryways are also important. You use it as a utility space for your coat and keys. But, when you’re selling, make it welcoming by putting in a small bench, a vase of fresh-cut flowers or even some cookies.

 

RESTOR | Early Fall Home Maintenance Checklist

Markus Kidwell contractors, Home Improvement, home maintenance, Roofing, Siding

Fall-Home-Maintenance-Tips-2-300x300It’s Really Never Too Early To Prepare Your Home for Winter

For many of us, it seems like the Summer of 2016 just started, but the reality is school is either back in session or just around the corner. That can only mean one thing in Central Indiana…FALL IS SOON TO FOLLOW! And because RESTOR has always advocated maintenance over repair, we’re happy to bring you the following checklist of things you should start to work on as time (and good weather) allows. Most of the tasks listed below are well within the average person’s ability. But even if you choose to have a professional complete them for you, it’s worth the expense. You’ll save money — and maybe even your family.

Here’s the checklist at a glance. See the following pages for more detailed guidance.

  • Get your mind in the gutters. Inspect and clean gutters and downspouts.
  • Button up your overcoat. Seal gaps and cracks around windows and doors with weather-stripping and caulk.
  • Get on top of roof problems. Inspect your roof for damaged or curled shingles, corroded flashing, or leaky vents.
  • Walks the walks (and drives). Take steps to repair damaged sidewalks, driveways, and steps.
  • Chill out. Drain and winterize outdoor faucets and irrigation systems.
  • Freshen your filter. Clean or replace dirty furnace filters.
  • Give your furnace a physical. Have a professional inspect your heating system.
  • Gather round the hearth. Check fireplaces for soot or creosote build-up. Better yet, schedule a visit from a reputable chimney sweep.
  • Keep the humidifier humming. Clean the plates or pads to ensure efficient operation.
  • Head-off gas problems. If you have a gas-fired room heater, have it inspected by a pro. Also, perform any routine maintenance recommended by the maker.
  • Keep the wood fires burning brightly. Wood stoves are making a comeback. To avoid a deadly situation, be sure to inspect yours before firing it up.
  • Keep your family safe at home. A home safety check should be an annual ritual in every household. Test smoke and CO monitors, inspect (or install) fire extinguishers, review fire escape plans, and rid your home of old newspapers and other fire hazards.

Get your mind in the gutters. Your roof’s drainage system annually diverts thousands of gallons of water from your house’s exterior and foundation walls. That’s why it is so important to keep this system flowing smoothly. Clogged gutters can lead to damaged exterior surfaces and to water in your basement. They are also more prone to rust and corrosion. Before the leaves fly this fall, have your gutters cleaned, then covered with mesh guards to keep debris from returning.

Step-by-step instructions for inspecting and cleaning gutters

Button up your overcoat. A home with air leaks around windows and doors is like a coat left unbuttoned. Gaps in caulk and weather-stripping can account for a 10% of your heating bills, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

Weather-stripping is easily the most cost-effective way to rein in heating and cooling costs. This humble material also reduces drafts and keeps your home more comfortable year-round. Because weather stripping can deteriorate over time, it is important to inspect it periodically.

If you suspect a problem with weather stripping, you have several options for checking. Close a door or window on a strip of paper; if the paper slides easily, your weatherstripping isn’t doing its job. Or, close the door or window and hold a lighted candle near the frame. (Don’t let the flame get near anything flammable!) If the flame flickers at any spot along the frame, you have an air leak.

While you’re at it, also check for missing or damaged caulk around windows, doors, and entry points for electrical, cable, phone, gas, and so. Seal any gaps with a suitable caulk.

Easy instructions for weatherizing your home

Get on top of roof problems. Few homeowner problems are more vexing than a leaky roof. Once the dripping starts, finding the source of the problem can be time-consuming. Stop problems this fall before ice and winter winds turn them from annoyances into disasters.

Here’s how: Inspect your roof from top to bottom, using binoculars if necessary. Check ridge shingles for cracks and wind damage. Look for damage to metal flashing in valleys and around vents and chimneys. Scan the entire roof for missing, curled, or damaged shingles. Look in your gutters for large accumulations of granules, a sign that your roof is losing its coating; expect problems soon. Finally, make sure your gutters are flowing freely.

Note: Roof-mounted television antennas, even if they aren’t in use, may have guy wires holding them in place. Look for loose or missing guywires. If you see some, and your antenna is no longer being used, consider having it removed altogether.

Learn how to perform minor roof repairs

Walk the walks (and drives). Damaged walkways, drives, and steps are a hazard year round, but their dangers are compounded when the weather turns icy. Fixing problems in the fall is also critical to preventing little problems from becoming expensive headaches.

Look for cracks more than 1/8-inch wide, uneven sections, and loose railings on steps. Check for disintegration of asphalt, or washed-out materials on loose-fill paths.

Most small jobs are well within the ability of a do-it-yourselver, but save major repairs for experienced hands.

How to repair concrete steps

Patching concrete

Chill out. If you live in an area with freezing weather, take steps to ensure that outside faucets (also called sill cocks) and inground irrigation systems don’t freeze and burst.

Here’s how: Close any shut-off valves serving outside faucets, then open the outside faucet to drain the line. (There may be a small cap on the faucet you can loosen to facilitate this draining.) If you don’t have shut-off valves, and your faucets are not “freezeproof ” types, you may benefit from styrofoam faucet covers sold at home centers.

To freeze-proof an in-ground irrigation system, follow the manufacturer’s procedure for draining it and protecting it from winter damage.

Freshen your filter. Furnace filters trap dust that would otherwise be deposited on your furniture, woodwork, and so on. Clogged filters make it harded to keep your home at a comfortable temperature, and can serious increase your utility bills. A simple monthly cleaning is all it takes to keep these filters breathing free and clear.

Here’s how: Disposable filters can be vaccumed once before replacement. Foam filters can also be vaccumed, but they don’t need to be replaced unless they are damaged. Use a soft brush on a vacuum cleaner. If the filter is metal or electrostatic, remove and wash it with a firm water spray.

Finding your furnace’s filter

Give your furnace a physical. Once a year, it’s a good idea to have your heating system inspected by a professional. To avoid the last-minute rush, consider scheduling this task in early fall, before the heating season begins.

Here are signs that you should have an inspection performed sooner:

Noisy belts. Unusual screeches or whines may be a signal that belts connected to the blower motor are worn or damaged.

Poor performance. A heating system that doesn’t seem to work as well as it once did could be a sign of various problems. Your heating ducts might be blocked, the burners might be misadjusted, or the blower motor could be on its last legs. One check you should be sure to conduct: Make sure your furnace filter is clean.

Erratic behavior. This could be caused by a faulty thermostat or a misadjusted furnace.

Gather round the hearth. Even if you use your fireplace only occasionally, you should check it annually for damage and hazards.

Inspect your flue for creosote. Creosote is a flammable by-product of burning wood. If it accumulates in a flue or chimney, the result can be a devastating fire. Have your chimney inspected annually for creosote buildup. If you use a fireplace or wood stove frequently, have the flue inspected after each cord of wood burned.

For most people, the best option is to have your entire chimney system inspected by a chimney sweep. Once you know what to look for, you can perform the inspection by shining a bright flashlight up the flue, looking for any deposits approaching 1/8 inch thick. These deposits should be cleaned by an experienced chimney sweep.

Look for flue blockages. Birds love to nest at the top of an unprotected flue. A chimney cap can prevent this from happening. If you don’t have a cap, look up the flu to ensure that there are no obstructions.

Exercise the damper. The damper is the metal plate that opens and closes the flu just above the firebox. Move it to the open and closed positions to ensure that it is working properly.

Check your chimney for damage. Make certain that the flue cap (the screen or baffle covering the top of the chimney) is in place. Inspect brickchimneys for loose or broken joints. If access is a problem, use binoculars.

Keep the humidifier humming. You may know that bone dry winter air is bad for your health, but did you also know it can make fine wood more prone to cracking? You and your home will feel more comfortable if you keep your central humidifier in tip-top shape during the months it is running.

Here’s how: First, inspect the plates or pads, and if necessary, clean them in a strong laundry detergent solution. Rinse and scrape off mineral deposits with a wire brush or steel wool.

Head-off gas problems. Keeping a gas heater in good shape is both a safety and a cost issue. An improperly maintained heater can spew poisons into the air of your home, or it may simply be costing you more to operate. Have a professional check these devices annually. There are also some maintenance items you should address.

Here’s how: First, shut off the heater. Then check the air-shutter openings and exhaust vents for dirt and dust. If they are dirty, vacuum the air passages to the burner and clean the burner of lint and dirt. Follow the manufacturer’s advice for any other needed maintenance.

Keep the wood fires burning brightly. Woodburning stoves are a great way to add atmosphere and warmth to your home. But regular inspections are needed to ensure that these devices don’t become a safety hazard. Here’s how to check them.

Inspect stovepipes. Cracks in stovepipes attached to wood stoves can release toxic fumes into your home. Throughout the heating season, you should check for corrosion, holes, or loose joints. Clean the stovepipe, and then look for signs of deterioration or looseness. Replace stovepipe if necessary.

Look for corrosion and cracks. Check for signs of rust or cracking in the stove’s body or legs.

Check safety features. Make sure that any required wall protection is installed according to the manufacturer’s specifications and that the unit sits on an approved floor material. If you have young children, be sure to fence off the stove when it is in operation.

At least once a year, do a top-to-bottom review of your home’s safety features. This is also a good time to get the family together for a review of your fire evacuation plan. Here’s how to do this:

Smoke and CO detectors. Replace the batteries in each smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) detector, then vacuum them with a soft brush attachment. Test the detectors by pressing the test button or holding a smoke source (like a blown-out candle) near the unit. If you haven’t already, install a smoke detector on every floor of your home, including the basement.

Fire extinguishers. Every home should have at least one fire extinguisher rated for all fire types (look for an A-B-C rating on the label). At a minimum, keep one near the kitchen; having one per floor isn’t a bad idea. Annually, check the indicator on the pressure gauge to make sure the extinguisher is charged. Make certain that the lock pin is intact and firmly in place, and check that the discharge nozzle is not clogged. Clean the extinguisher and check it for dents, scratches, and corrosion. Replace if the damage seems severe. Note: Fire extinguishers that are more than six years old should be replaced. Mark the date of purchase on the new unit with a permanent marker.

Fire escape plans. Every bedroom, including basement bedrooms, should have two exit paths. Make sure windows aren’t blocked by furniture or other items. Ideally, each upper-floor bedroom should have a rope ladder near the window for emergency exits. Review what to do in case of fire, and arrange a safe meeting place for everyone away from the house.

General cleanup. Rid your home of accumulations of old newspapers and leftover hazardous household chemicals. (Check with your state or local Environmental Protection Agency about the proper way to discard dangerous chemicals.) Store flammable materials and poisons in approved, clearly labeled containers. Keep a clear space around heaters, furnaces, and other heat-producing appliances.


 

Originally published in Better Homes and Gardens

RESTOR | Drones for Roofing? The Time Has Come

Markus Kidwell contractors, drones, Home Improvement, Return on Investment for Roofing, Roofing, technology, Videos

Christopher Brown, co-owner of Next New Homes Group, uses his multi-rotor helicopter drone to take aerial video of a home in Sacramento, Calif., on February 25, 2014. Drones are increasingly being used by small companies to shoot videos for real estate, car commercials, weddings, sports events, and other instances where aerial shots are needed. (Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/MCT)

Christopher Brown, co-owner of Next New Homes Group, uses his multi-rotor helicopter drone to take aerial video of a home in Sacramento, Calif., on February 25, 2014. Drones are increasingly being used by small companies to shoot videos for real estate, car commercials, weddings, sports events, and other instances where aerial shots are needed. (Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/MCT)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), commonly known as a drone, as an unmanned aircraft system (UAS), or by several other names, is an aircraft without a human pilot aboard. The flight of UAVs may operate with various degrees of autonomy: either under remote control by a human operator, or fully or intermittently autonomously, by onboard computers.[1]
Compared to manned aircraft, UAVs are often preferred for missions that are too “dull, dirty or dangerous”[2] for humans. They originated mostly in military applications, although their use is expanding in commercial, scientific, recreational and other applications,[3] such as policing and surveillance, aerial photography, agriculture and drone racing. Civilian drones now vastly outnumber military drones, with estimates of over a million sold by 2015.
Forward-thinking roofing companies are starting to develop additional uses. RESTOR believes there are at least 5 legitimate reasons drones fit our business well:

1. Highly Accurate Estimates for Customers

An age-old challenge for roofers is providing a completely accurate estimate for their clients. Some modern roofs feature areas that are nearly inaccessible. Trees can virtually prevent a roofer from getting to every nook and cranny for inspection and measuring purposes. Other roofs have extreme pitches, creating more risk for the roofer to climb up the ladder and inspect the damage.

With a drone, these problems can go away quickly. Drones can provide accurate visuals with a high-resolution camera to record videos and pictures of the roof, especially in the hard-to-reach areas. Roofers can estimate more accurately because of the drone’s ability to gather general and specific information on that particular roof’s damage.

2. Less Liability

Let’s face it, humans have accidents. Roofers are no different. And although many of us are experts in climbing ladders and traversing various roof lines, mistakes can be made. And these mistakes can be painful both from a physical and financial standpoint. If we can eliminate those mistakes and accidents, it’s better for everyone involved.

Drones can prevent these injuries from happening to roofers. Drones record the roof from a bird’s eye view, keeping everyone on the ground during the initial quoting process. Not only will this prevent accidents, drones can typically get the job done much more quickly than setting up a ladder and climbing onto the roof.

3. Immediate Return on Investment

Most drones are inexpensive for businesses, currently costing $1,000 or less. Drones also take less time to gather data from multiple buildings. One company in Nebraska was able to record videos for 11 apartment buildings in one hour, all from their drone. Before the company bought the drone, it would have taken six hours to assess those same apartment buildings.

Some roofers might dread the lengthy training time to learn how to reliably fly a drone over a client’s home, but there is software on the market that takes much of the time (and stress) out of the equation. Many drone pilots state they were extremely comfortable flying their drones after roughly 35 hours of practice.

4. Developing Guidelines

Even though drones are great for businesses in general, the government has been behind on passing regulations concerning drones and other UAV’s. As of now, there are 17 states that regulate drone flights, and there are other states considering the same legislation. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) cannot track and monitor these devices, and they also don’t have enough manpower to regulate the restrictions.

The FAA has provided a few exceptions for businesses. State Farm has been granted one of these exeptions, using drones to assess roof damage for insurance purposes. With clearer guidelines, expect drones to be used not just in the roofing industry, but in other industries as well.

5. Fun Factor

Businesses of all types are either buying drones or looking into the feasiblity of employing them in their business. And really, why wouldn’t they? Drones are fun!

Today’s technology makes it easier for roofers to provide accurate estimates to their clients. Drones create less liability for roofers, have a great return on investment, and are fun to fly. Once clearer regulations are passed, drones will be on the rise for businesses across the country.

RESTOR | We’d Love to Hear From You

Markus Kidwell contractors, Emergency Restoration, Online Reviews, Roofing

File this blog under the heading of More Things the Internet Has Changed.

QuickOnlineReviewsStats

Let’s face it, online ratings and reviews are a simple fact of doing business today. Most folks will search for information prior to making just about any major purchase and many research even the smallest of goods or services before making a final decision. Google makes this research terribly easy and much less time-consuming than ever before. Businesses that provide major services – like RESTOR – rely on having a great reputation by going the extra mile to delight our customers. It’s part of our overall mission and why we proudly post the following on our website homepage:

  • RESTOR No-Leak Guarantee covers your roofing system for 5 to 50 years, depending on the type of system it is and the materials used. As proof of the integrity of our products and craftsmanship, we can point to one of the lowest warranty costs in the industry.
  • Restor Roofing ProjectQuality assurance at RESTOR starts with quality people.  Each member of our quality assurance team must have at least 10 years actual residential roofing installation experience and five years supervisory experience.
  • Our inspectors conduct in-progress inspections at every critical point in the installation process. They conduct an exhaustive final inspection.

If you have experienced the first-rate craftsmanship and total attention to detail we work diligently to offer every customer every day, please feel free to post a review and let us know how we did on your roofing or restoration project. We always appreciate the feedback and look forward to serving your family and friends in the future.

10588 Coppergate

RESTOR Restoration Indianapolis | 3 Simple Steps to Having Your Home Repaired Following a Catastrophe

Markus Kidwell contractors, Emergency Restoration, Home Improvement

When Mother Nature brings her wrath and causes property damage from flood, fire, hail, wind, tornado or even ice…it can be a very stressful and confusing endeavor having repairs made. I am here to tell you, it doesn’t have to be! Following a catastrophe, there are really only 3 Simple Steps that we require our property owner customers to do to ensure that we can properly handle their repairs.

Here are the 3 Simple Steps:

  1. Call your insurance company following a severe weather event or property issue that needs insurance assistance.
  2. File a claim for the damages to your home or business and write down the name and number of your insurance adjuster assigned to your claim.
  3. Schedule a specific time for the adjuster to come out and see your property. Call your contractor and have the contractor and the insurance adjuster meet at your property to assess the damage TOGETHER.

Step 3 is very important. This will ensure that you are properly taken care of because BOTH the insurance representative and the construction professional can meet together to determine your repairs. When that happens, everything goes very smoothly. Here at RESTOR we are constantly meeting with insurance companies in a beneficial relationship that allows us to do our job better and help our customers more quickly and efficiently.

Give our expert team a call at 844.4RESTOR for all your restoration needs! We provide full-service repair, restoration, and re-models for fire damage, storm damage, hail damage, mold damage and water damage restoration. Our local Indianapolis restoration team can be reached 24/7 at 317-644-0099

Weatherwood architectural shingle roof

RESTOR | Choosing The Right Contractor

Markus Kidwell contractors

Choosing the right contractor is one of the most important decisions you’ll ever make so it’s worthwhile to prepare yourself properly. After all it could make all the difference between having a wonderful and fulfilling experience or one that’s a total nightmare!

RESTOR is a full service general contractor specializing in commercial and residential properties. Start with your friends and family- You can also talk with a building inspector, who’ll know which contractors routinely meet code requirements.

Once you’ve assembled a list, we at Restor recommend that you make a quick call to each of your prospects and ask them the following questions:

  • Do they take on projects of your size?
  • Can they give you a list of previous clients?
  • How many other projects would they have going at the same time?
  • How long have they worked with their subcontractors?

A contractor should be able to answer your questions satisfactorily and in a manner that puts you at ease. Check in with your state’s consumer protection agency and your local Better Business Bureau to make sure contractors don’t have a history of disputes with clients or subcontractors.

Now that you’ve narrowed your list, put your research to use, call up two or more clients to find how their project went and ask to see the finished product. Throw out the lowball bid! This contractor is probably cutting corners, or worse desperate for work, hardly an encouraging sign in a healthy economy.

Beyond technical competence, comfort should play an equal or greater role in your decision. The single most important factor in choosing a contractor is how well you and he communicate. All things being equal, it’s better to spend more and get someone you’re comfortable with!

Give our expert team a call at 844.4RESTOR for all your restoration needs! We provide full-service repair, restoration, and re-models for water damage, storm damage, hail damage, mold damage, and fire damage restoration. Our local Indianapolis restoration team can be reached at 317-644-0099.

storm damage restoration Indianapolis

Restor | It’s Important to Have Your Home Inspected Following a Severe Storm

Brian Southard Emergency Restoration, Water Damage

Have you experienced bad storms recently? If so, your home may be in need of possible restoration services. Severe thunderstorms are most common in the spring or summer months and usually involve a strong winds, hail, and a lot of rain. If your property has experienced a severe thunderstorm, it’s always best to have the property inspected to determine if you’ve sustained storm damage.

We’ve all heard the expression, “take care of your body and your body will take care of you.” As a business owner or homeowner, you should apply this same wisdom to your commercial or residential building and the premises around it. While it’s easy to see physical damage that can be caused by large storms, Mother Nature also slowly and consistently breaks down your building’s defenses against future weather conditions. The specific weather conditions your building is exposed to, coupled with your maintenance plan, play a large part in the strength and longevity of your building and your resulting bottom line.

 Here are a few examples of severe weather conditions that can damage
 properties:

  • Expansion and contraction due to seasonal temperature swings and daily temperature fluctuations can create leaks in sealants, gaskets, and other building materials. 
  • UV exposure from sun, as well as snow, rain, drought, hail and smog, can degrade roots and wall systems.
  • Salt sprays in coastal locations can corrode various metals, while acid rain in Northern locations can also eat away at some metals.
  • Repeated windstorm exposure can cause fatigue on metal and wooden components making them more prone to failure in the next big storm.

RESTOR is a full service general contractor specializing in commercial and residential properties. We provide full-service repair, restoration, and re-models for water, storm, hail, mold, and fire damage restoration. Give our expert team a call at 844.4RESTOR for all your restoration needs! Our local Indianapolis restoration team can be reached at 317-644-0099.

HELP WANTED AD

We’re Hiring

Brian Southard Uncategorized

 

 

JOIN THE RESTOR TEAM.   RESTOR is seeking talented individuals in multiple locations surrounding Carmel, Indiana and Buffalo Grove, Illinois.  Come work for a full service nationwide industry leader.  There are multiple positions open in our Midwest locations.  We are looking for serious applicants who are passionate about building the brand, expanding existing territories and developing new.  Submit your resume today for consideration to jobs@restorteam.com.  

 

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